Church Drunk Summer Reading List!

Summertime, and the living is easy…except when it’s not. Regardless of how easy or not your summer may be, there is no better time of year to sit on the back porch (or wherever you like to read) and open a good book. Now, we know that many of you bright young Catholic devotees are planning on whiling away the summer hours with a Lectionary or that classic page-turner, The Catechism of the Catholic Church, but if you’re looking for something a bit more interesting engaging not viciously dry like some sort of horrid soul vampire literary, then we have put together a lovely list of books to lift your soul and inspire your summer!

The list below will serve as the basis for the next few episodes of our podcast, so feel free to pick a favorite and join us in the conversation, or just jump in for the ride. We tried to include a mix of different authors, voices, and styles, so hopefully something speaks to you!

The Yiddish Policemen’s Union by Michael Chabon

The Alchemist by Paulo Coelho

Good Omens by Neil Gaiman & Terry Pratchett

The Iowa Baseball Confederacy by W.P. Kinsella

Dandelion Wine by Ray Bradbury

Jitterbug Perfume by Tom Robbins

The 13 Clocks by James Thurber

God’s Mechanics by Br. Guy Consolmagno

Take a look, read a book, and let us know how it goes (in the reading rainbow…the reading rainBOW!!!). If you have a favorite summer read, let us know what it is by sending us an e-mail or hitting us up on Twitter (@churchdrunkpod). We’d love to hear from you. Happy reading!

-Dizzy & Ges

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